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Author Topic: Problem using the Enhanced Intel Speedstep® Technology (EIST)  (Read 2827 times)

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JohnM

    Topic Starter


    Greenhorn

    Hello.

    Have been looking around the internet and i forums to find some help to my question.
    I have a Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 2.4GHz on a Asus P5W DH Deluxe motherboard. And they are both supposed to support EIST.
    Have read that as long as you run Windows Vista and have power plan "Power saver" selected. Vista would automatically adjust the CPU speed according to the CPU load.

    I have something similar on my laptop.
    It runs Windows XP and I use the program SpeedSwitchXP. That program adjust the CPU speed according to the CPU load.
    When my laptop is idle, it can lower the CPU speed to around 50MHz. And the CPU is a 2000MHz.
    This result in that I save a lot of battery and there is less heat.

    So I want the CPU on my stationary computer to do the same. Because it generates a lot of heat and noice when it is idle or I'm just surfing the internet..
    Isn't there anyone out there that could help me? Since it looks like that Vista can't manage this.. isn't there something I could do to make it like this?

    Cheers!
     
    Btw: I'm using Vista Business x64

    Calum

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    Re: Problem using the Enhanced Intel Speedstep® Technology (EIST)
    « Reply #1 on: April 24, 2009, 04:43:08 AM »
    If EIST isn't enough for you, try RMClock.
    I used to use it on my laptop and it was great, it does take some setting up but it's worth it in the end.
    Hope this helps.

    JohnM

      Topic Starter


      Greenhorn

      Re: Problem using the Enhanced Intel Speedstep® Technology (EIST)
      « Reply #2 on: April 24, 2009, 04:48:30 AM »
      If EIST isn't enough for you, try RMClock.
      I used to use it on my laptop and it was great, it does take some setting up but it's worth it in the end.
      Hope this helps.

      I think EIST would be enough for me, but as long as I don't get it to work, it is no good  :P
      Does RMClock work on my home office computer and is it constant active. So it changes the CPU speed itself? I don't have to decrease and increase manually?

      Calum

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      Re: Problem using the Enhanced Intel Speedstep® Technology (EIST)
      « Reply #3 on: April 24, 2009, 05:25:11 AM »
      Sorry, seems I read your post wrong, I didn't realise you mean EIST wasn't working at all.
      Anyway, RMClock does a better job, if you're concerned about heat.
      It should work on most computers, and once you've got it set up it's fully automatic.
      It's just a matter of spending some time adjusting the steps for it to change speeds, adjusting voltages, etc.
      There are some better guides out there than I could write about how to use it, so if you're stuck there is help available.

      Kurtiskain



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      Re: Problem using the Enhanced Intel Speedstep® Technology (EIST)
      « Reply #4 on: April 24, 2009, 11:47:29 PM »
      You may have to enable it in your BIOS

      ASUS boards normally have a little setting called Q-FAN, which changes fan speeds at different temperatures.
      I have an ASUS P5KPL-CM, and mine utilized EIST as soon as I set it up.

      Looking at the ASUS site...your board seems to have a similar item called AI Cool

      Ill take a squiz through your motherboard manual to ry and find out where in the BIOS you can enable it.

      Kurtiskain



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      Re: Problem using the Enhanced Intel Speedstep® Technology (EIST)
      « Reply #5 on: April 24, 2009, 11:54:47 PM »
      The 'AI quiet' feature can be found on the Hardware Monitor page on the Power Tab :)
      Also on this page, are your Q-FAN settings :)

      Page 4-35 in your user guide

      JohnM

        Topic Starter


        Greenhorn

        Re: Problem using the Enhanced Intel Speedstep® Technology (EIST)
        « Reply #6 on: April 26, 2009, 11:34:07 AM »
        Sorry, seems I read your post wrong, I didn't realise you mean EIST wasn't working at all.
        Anyway, RMClock does a better job, if you're concerned about heat.
        It should work on most computers, and once you've got it set up it's fully automatic.
        It's just a matter of spending some time adjusting the steps for it to change speeds, adjusting voltages, etc.
        There are some better guides out there than I could write about how to use it, so if you're stuck there is help available.

        I have downloaded and installed RMclock, and can see that it is already adjusting the cpu speed. But not enough. The CPU is not any colder and the fan still runs fast.
        You know of a god guide for adjusting RMClock? I'm a neewbi about cpu speed, voltage etc... So i'm not so comfortable about adjusting so much..

        JohnM

          Topic Starter


          Greenhorn

          Re: Problem using the Enhanced Intel Speedstep® Technology (EIST)
          « Reply #7 on: April 26, 2009, 11:44:02 AM »
          You may have to enable it in your BIOS

          ASUS boards normally have a little setting called Q-FAN, which changes fan speeds at different temperatures.
          I have an ASUS P5KPL-CM, and mine utilized EIST as soon as I set it up.

          Looking at the ASUS site...your board seems to have a similar item called AI Cool

          Ill take a squiz through your motherboard manual to ry and find out where in the BIOS you can enable it.

          Thanx for the trouble checking tru the manual. Have checked my BIOS, and AI Quit is enabled.
          But about the CPU Q-Fan Mode. There was 2 settings to choose about. [PWM] and [DC]. [PWM] was for 4-pin fan cable and [DC] was for 3-pin fan cable.
          Q-Fan was enabled, but was set on [PWM]. I don't know what setting I should use? The CPU fan cable consist of three cables that goes to the motherboard. A black, a red and a white. Does that mean I have a 3-pin CPU fan? And if i choose the [DC] setting, the fan speed may be reduced?

          JohnM

            Topic Starter


            Greenhorn

            Re: Problem using the Enhanced Intel Speedstep® Technology (EIST)
            « Reply #8 on: April 26, 2009, 11:53:02 AM »
            The 'AI quiet' feature can be found on the Hardware Monitor page on the Power Tab :)
            Also on this page, are your Q-FAN settings :)

            Page 4-35 in your user guide

            I have had another check in the BIOS settings while I have been looking in the manual. And there is several topics in the manual that is missing in the BIOS.  ???
            Like:
            CPU Q-Fan Control
            CPU Fan Profile
            Chassis Q-Fan Control


            I don't know why..
            But I tried to change the CPU Q-Fan Mode from [PWM] to [DC], but so far nothing has happened..

            JohnM

              Topic Starter


              Greenhorn

              Re: Problem using the Enhanced Intel Speedstep® Technology (EIST)
              « Reply #9 on: April 27, 2009, 08:27:03 AM »
              Sorry, seems I read your post wrong, I didn't realise you mean EIST wasn't working at all.
              Anyway, RMClock does a better job, if you're concerned about heat.
              It should work on most computers, and once you've got it set up it's fully automatic.
              It's just a matter of spending some time adjusting the steps for it to change speeds, adjusting voltages, etc.
              There are some better guides out there than I could write about how to use it, so if you're stuck there is help available.

              Have now been playing with RMClock for a few days now.. Concentrating on undervolting..
              Have used this pictureguide. http://forum.notebookreview.com/showthread.php?p=2637648#post2637648
              My CPU is now using the minimal voltage available tru RMClock. Did not get the temperature so much down, but it got a bit better. Was not possible to reduce the voltage any more.. But after using  ORTHOS, my computer is still stable.
              But when I'm using RMClock, the only thing that has been adjusted is the voltage to the CPU.
              Does anyone know if there is anything more I can do with this program to reduce my CPU speed?

              Calum

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              Re: Problem using the Enhanced Intel Speedstep® Technology (EIST)
              « Reply #10 on: April 28, 2009, 12:40:53 PM »
              You can use RMClock to reduce both the speeds and voltages.
              I can't remember exactly how it's done, it's been over a year since I last used the program but the guide you linked to does seem to cover it well.
              Sorry I can't be of any more assistance.