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Author Topic: e-mail client  (Read 1610 times)

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49 M

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    e-mail client
    « on: January 02, 2011, 02:37:08 PM »
    My e-mail is web based with my ISP. On some websites there is a contact button that would open outlook express on my old computer so I could contact them. This computer is Win 7 & when I click contact I get a pop up saying e-mail client is not installed. Is there a client I can download that will work on IE 8 & still let me use my ISP web mail?

    soybean



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    Re: e-mail client
    « Reply #1 on: January 03, 2011, 08:29:20 AM »
    Yes, it's Windows Live Mail.  You need to download Windows Live Essentials, which consists of Mail and numerous other components.  You do not need to install all the components if they are not wanted; you'll have the option to select which ones you want to install after starting the installation.

    patio

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    Re: e-mail client
    « Reply #2 on: January 03, 2011, 08:48:33 AM »
    Depending on how your ISP has mail setup Thunderbird may also be an option for you...

    From the fine people who bring us FireFox.
       
     
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    49 M

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      Re: e-mail client
      « Reply #3 on: January 04, 2011, 08:55:49 AM »
      Thanks for the suggestion's. I'm downloading Live Essentials now but it appears to be a large file so it will take a while on dial up. Can Live Mail be set to leave emails where they are & not import it all? The help center doesn't address this. What is an RSS feed? There are instructions to add an RSS feed as well but I have no idea what that means or what its used for. I use the web mail provided at peoplepc (dial up isp) so I hope it will work with this.

      soybean



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      Re: e-mail client
      « Reply #4 on: January 04, 2011, 09:16:39 AM »
      Oh, I'm getting a different picture here now.  You were only using OE when you clicked on an email link on a website and OE opened.  But, you normally accessed your mail via your web browser, i.e., as webmail, right?

      Yes, you could use WLM that way, just as you did OE.  But, as you know now, the full Windows Live Essentials is a large download.  If you merely want an email client installed that will open when you click on an email link on a website, I'm inclined to think installing Thunderbird, as patio mentioned, might be a better option for you.  The download would only be the Thunderbird email software and, therefore, would be a much smaller download.

      BC_Programmer


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      Re: e-mail client
      « Reply #5 on: January 04, 2011, 12:37:48 PM »
      an RSS feed is a XML file that sits in a predefined location; on it's own, it's not really all that useful. however, When you "subscribe" to an RSS feed, you are telling your browser (or feed reader, or, whatever software gave you the option) "hey, I want to know when something new is added here" and then every time you start the browser and at a set interval thereafter (usually 30 minutes to an hour) the browser will download that XML file and see if there are any new items. It can then either say "hey, there's some new stuff to read here!" or, do something different. Firefox, for example, supports a feature called "Live bookmarks" which basically let's you subscribe to an RSS feed and have that "bookmark" display a popup menu that contains the last 20 or so items in the feed.


      TL;DR version: think of it as a stock ticker for web pages.
      I was trying to dereference Null Pointers before it was cool.

      nick2

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      Re: e-mail client
      « Reply #6 on: January 09, 2011, 06:50:27 AM »
      I've used thunderbird before and it takes some getting used to if you're an outlook person.  I've used outlook for like 10 years or so, then tried to convert to Thunderbird and it was a little tough at first :)