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Author Topic: ThinkServer with Server 2012  (Read 5086 times)

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Whitie III

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ThinkServer with Server 2012
« on: December 10, 2014, 09:30:30 AM »
Would you recommend a ThinkServer TS140 w/ Server 2012? Is it too much for what I would like to do?  I only need to set one up to save files remotely, remote printer plus remote desktop and maybe a domain. Could I get away with a very high end i7 or a low end Xenon? It will be used in my home only. I have regular "off the shelf type" home pc with 32 gb of storage on a 500 GB HDD, 2 gb of ram and Windows 7 Pro now, but that won't cut it for if I want to set up a domain and saving files over the network from other computers to the "server" I know 1TB or 2TB would be an overkill now, since I don't use more then a 32 GB partition.

Recommendations? (only want a Lenovo)
« Last Edit: December 10, 2014, 09:41:38 AM by Whitie III »

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Re: ThinkServer with Server 2012
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2014, 11:41:08 AM »
Older equipment can be used as a server. Your stuff looks good.
A domain will cost about $10 per year.
Le's review this. You want to have your own server located in your house you want  to get into it  from other places while traveling. Is that tight? How much data? 10 GB? Or maybe vc20? Most people seldom have more that 40 GB of personal data. 

Noways many people use a "cloud" service for remote data. I have two I got for free. I also have two domains I use separately where I could store a large amount of data. But one thing I have never tried. I have never tried to build my own server.

Do you want you to make your own server for:
- better privacy?
- unlimited storage ?
- lower costs?
- as a hobby project?
The above could all fit your needs. But be aware about the downside of have your own DIY home service.
The capital cost is high, unless you already have the hardware.
Leaving it on 24/7 without somebody in the house may present a fire hazard.
If you want it to have high speed transfers, you will have to rent special connection. Most Internet connections are asymmetrical. The speed is faster in one direction.

Having somebody else do all the work would coast about $50 per month, but with limited storage.

There are a number of articles about how to build your own home server.
Build an Awesome $500 Windows Home Server
Quote
Power turned out to be the big differentiating factor on our Home Servers. While the dual-core Intel machine drew a meager 49W at idle and 70W under load, the quad-core Athlon was a juice guzzler in comparison--pulling 71W at idle and 90W under load. While it's true that it's a little unfair to compare power use between a dual-core and quad core, the performance (in video transcoding and network transfers) and price are close enough that we're comfortable making the comparison. And, the fact that the Intel machine was fast enough to do what we wanted while pulling less power was enough to make it the winner of our Windows Home Server test.
Does that help?  :)

Whitie III

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Re: ThinkServer with Server 2012
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2014, 01:38:33 AM »
would like a prebuilt one... i can get one with an i7-4790, 4 gb of ram and a 1TB hdd

yes i would like to access my files away from home... server 2012 lets you create your own domain... i don't like and trust cloud storage, costly for more then the standard amount of storage (google charges for more then 10 GB i think)


camerongray



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Re: ThinkServer with Server 2012
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2014, 05:07:30 AM »
Is this purely for file storage?  How many users are you planning?  An i7 would be extremely powerful and likely a lot more than you would need if it is just a few users using it as a fileserver.  HP Microservers are good value options and are very power efficient.

You may want to look at something a bit cheaper (i3, Pentium, Celeron) as an i7/Xeon could be a lot more power than you need.  You may also want to consider Linux as a cheaper alternative to Windows Server which is very expensive.

When you say a "domain" are you referring to a Domain Name or an Active Directory Domain, if the latter, why do you need this for a home user?

I would also highly recommend getting one with a pair of hard drives and running them in RAID, you are running the machine 24/7 so you'd want some sort of redundancy on the hard drives.

Whitie III

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Re: ThinkServer with Server 2012
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2014, 03:01:39 PM »
I only will have 6 or 7 computers accessing the server but not all at the same time

If I should go with a pentium or something then how would a core 2 duo from about the very beginning of the vista era (c. 2008) with 4 GB of ram do? I could get one for about 35 dollars IBM monitor, mouse, keyboard, and computer but is a Lenovo/IBM ThinkCentre and not something like a ThinkServer or ThinkStation but runs Vista Business. They claims it could run Windows 7 and Windows 8 is Windows 7 with a different interface, so I think Server 2008 or 2012 would work

I don't like Linux at all either

camerongray



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Re: ThinkServer with Server 2012
« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2014, 03:29:07 PM »
An older machine like that would be fine as long as it can fit a pair of hard drives so you can RAID them - You would also need to factor in the cost of Windows Server 2012 for it.

I'd also recommend the HP microservers - They are reasonably priced, power efficient and designed for 24/7 operation.  They also have space for plenty hard drives.

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Re: ThinkServer with Server 2012
« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2014, 07:11:09 PM »
Do not read this is you really hate Linux.  :)
LINUX HOME SERVER GUIDE
You don't have to like Linux to use it.
Linux is well fitted to low-cost server. It works well both on a local network or on the Internet. At one time near half of all servers were sing some form of Linux and Apache. And not just because of cost.  The software is well supported.

Is this to be mostly a server for people on the campus or facility?
How often would users have to get into the server from across town or across the state?  Because in some places a local company can help you with a fast WAN to cover a limited region of a city. 
Just saying....

Whitie III

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Re: ThinkServer with Server 2012
« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2014, 03:07:41 PM »
Well I finally got a ThinkCentre to work with Server 2012 after all the trouble... might need to get a larger hdd as it looks to have been on a server for quite some time in it's life do to the extremely small hdd for Windows Vista (when it used to have Vista) it has 4 gb of ram though, which may or may not be so good.... came with monitor, mouse and keyboard all which match the computer.... 35 dollars for all

Whitie III

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Re: ThinkServer with Server 2012
« Reply #8 on: December 17, 2014, 11:02:16 AM »
Do not read this is you really hate Linux.  :)
LINUX HOME SERVER GUIDE
You don't have to like Linux to use it.
Linux is well fitted to low-cost server. It works well both on a local network or on the Internet. At one time near half of all servers were sing some form of Linux and Apache. And not just because of cost.  The software is well supported.

Is this to be mostly a server for people on the campus or facility?
How often would users have to get into the server from across town or across the state?  Because in some places a local company can help you with a fast WAN to cover a limited region of a city. 
Just saying....

I got one of the only ISP in my area and I got the 4th or 5th speed up from the bottom... fast enough for me to watch youtube videos in 720P (I would like to watch one of the people I subscribe to in 4k but it's not a necessity)