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Author Topic: Want to start computer programming- need setup files for PC programming programs  (Read 1508 times)

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Coco423

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Hello again. I am not computer programming right now, and am inteeested and want to start. But- how do I so it, and where do I get the setup files for coding programs? I like to call coding computer programming, just so you know. Anyways, I was looking for a Linux Distro to put in VMWare, and I found Linux Mint and Linux From Scratch. I wanted to start with Linux From Scratch, C++, and Python. However, where do I get the setup files for them? Can I have two versions of a PC programming program, beta, official release, or both? I prefer the official sites of the programs, thank you. I don't know where some of the official sites are, though. Are there any books or pamplets or anything I can read that will help me?
I have no need for a LFS Live CD as my DVD/CD drive is having driver trouble. Which version of LFS is best? Please help!

Coco423

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Oh. Also Visual Studio.

I forgot to list my specs!
PC: Lenovo Thinkpad W500, Laptop
OS: Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit
RAM: 22 GB (4 GB of RAM)
HDD: 91 GB free out of 148 GB
Graphics Card: ATI Mobility Radeon HD 3650
Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo T9400 - 2.53 Ghz

Want to make programs for WinXP to Win10, maybe for OS below XP, but mostly for Win7 and WinXP as I own a laptop with WinXP, and one with Win7. Can I get the programs for my Win7 and my WinXP?

Coco423

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My XP Computer specs:
Computer: Dell Latitude D500, Laptop
HDD: 16 GB free out of 37 GB
OS: Windows XP Home Edition SP3 32-bit
Processor: Some model of Intel Core 2 Duo, I think, round 1 - 1.6 Ghz
Graphics: Unsure of it
Has CD/DVD drive
Designed for WinXP, Compatible with WinVista, but would not put Vista on a 40GB HDD

Think this model should have come with a harger GB sized HDD, but both laptops I have were given to me so I do not know tmif the HDD was replaced. My WinXP was made in 2006, my Win7 one was made in 2008, upgraded the one made in 2008 to Win7.

Squashman



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Oh. Also Visual Studio.

I forgot to list my specs!
OS: Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit

Want to make programs for WinXP to Win10, maybe for OS below XP, but mostly for Win7 and WinXP as I own a laptop with WinXP, and one with Win7. Can I get the programs for my Win7 and my WinXP?
Then why are you asking about Linux?

Coco423

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I have been wanting to try a Linux distro for a while. And want to start computer programming. I have two PCs, FYI.

BC_Programmer


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You don't just learn programming by slapping a few IDEs or compilers onto a system. You have to make a real commitment to learn the material, it cannot be spoon-fed.

My advice is always the same. Pick something, Python, C#, whatever - rather than vexing over what to choose, and then learn it. Don't hop around to different languages/IDEs/etc. because it get's hard, because you'll encounter those hurdles regardless of what you choose.

And until you actually make a choice it's a little hard to recommend software to use for the purpose. Not to mention what you use will vary based on your platform.

With Linux you can simply use the built-in package manager and search for the programming language(s) of your choice. Many are pre-installed so you can already write C and C++ programs usually, for example.
I was trying to dereference Null Pointers before it was cool.

Geek-9pm


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Listen to BC_Programmer.
What he says it true.


Coco423

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Oh. I was thinking about the Linux Mint distro to try, does that come with the programs? Which ones does it come with, and can I make Windows programs througj that in Linux?

Squashman



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I would highly suggest you find a local tech school that will teach you an Introduction to programming. Most schools offer online classes as well. 

Geek-9pm


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This not meant to get off topic.
Many schools in the USA are slow to teach or introduce computers into the classroom. But there are some notable exceptions to the shortcoming.

Channel 9 KQED, a educational TV station in San Francisco,  gave a report about the apparent lack of computer instruction in California classrooms.

The report noted schools were not using the free  materials. Good material is found on Yo0u Tube, twitter and Facebook. And Linux forums, I might  add.
https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/06/09/why-arent-more-schools-using-free-open-education-resources/
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Many schools want all students to have the same kind of device, with the same apps pre-downloaded. Students often have little choice over which tools they can use on their devices. Even for online research, many schools filter out useful websites like YouTube, Facebook and Twitter, making it harder and more restrictive.
The article goes on to draw  attention to a school in Pennsylvania.
A district in Pennsylvania is flying in the face of the trend towards closed systems, instead choosing open source devices and software...

 Remarkable!
Please read the article. Good stuff.  :)

BC_Programmer


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Oh. I was thinking about the Linux Mint distro to try, does that come with the programs? Which ones does it come with, and can I make Windows programs througj that in Linux?

How about you install it and answer this question for yourself?
I was trying to dereference Null Pointers before it was cool.

Coco423

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Ok. But first, I need to find the VMWare setup file and setup VMWare. Any setup files for that? What do I use to setup Microsoft Visual Studio, I think it is a disk, can you get the setup file off the internet and use it legally? C++ ans pytjon setup file possible locations? I will look for the setup files, just want to know where possible locations are. Looking now...

Allan

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In all my years running support forums and being on staff at other support forums such as CH I've never said this to anyone before: You are a very annoying person.

1) THINK before you post.
2) Use GOOGLE - it's your friend!!!
3) Stop responding to yourself in threads or bumping your own posts.

I don't want to have to restrict your posting privileges, but I will if you don't settle down. I've received multiple complaints about you from our members.

To other CH members - please don't pile on. Hopefully this one post will have the desired effect.

BC_Programmer


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Yes, Google can get the answer to most of those questions.

For Visual Studio you would want Visual  Studio Community Edition which is free (and isn't hobbled at all, it's the same as Professional, but licensed for personal use). Visual Studio includes A C++ compiler. You can get alternative compilers as well.

The forum isn't a good place to learn what a compiler does or  how to use it, nor how to program. That's better served by materials already written for that purpose.  Most "Learning Programming" books include software or at least guide you through installing the needed software,  so you might want ot look into that.

However, I do get the impression that you are easily distracted so I honestly am doubt you have the committment or drive necessary to make any progress on this; within a few hours you were infatuated with  Booting older versions of Windows via USB, for example.

I was trying to dereference Null Pointers before it was cool.

Geek-9pm


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Yes, Allan is correct. You need to focus and make good use of the advice you have reprieved. For good friendly help, this forum is the best you will find for anything relating to personal computers.
Set yourself some goals.
Plan to use our time wisely.
Do not bite of more than you can chew.

Do you need help using Google search?  Knowing how to search for information is actually like computer programming and the best programmers know how to find information in books, libraries, forums and other sources like Google and Twitter.

We like to help. You med to pay attention.  :)


Coco423

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Yes, I know how to google search and just did so a couple hours ago for this. I am fi ding the pages I need, and am fine now. I was a little to eager at first but now I realize that I need to take it a little at a time and pace myself. This was in reply to Geek-9pm's post, in case anybody is wondering why I posted.

Geek-9pm


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Take your time and persist and you will have good results.
Here is one of many sties that helps new students  look in the right direction.
https://lifehacker.com/top-10-ways-to-teach-yourself-to-code-1684250889
Quote
Programming is one of the most valuable skills you can pick up in these modern times, whether for career prospects or to stretch your brain and create something awesome. If you're just getting started on your coding journey, here are ten tips and resources to set you off on the right foot.

Worth reading  :)

DaveLembke



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Youtube has lots of videos as well on programming if your looking for learning by example. I have used youtube myself not for how to program but for figuring out my way around an IDE. Watching someone else show the steps on how to start a project and compile a project etc might be helpful when there are so many functions and its an overload of where to go and what to do.

Many youtube videos dont go into ( WHY ) something does what it does, and this is where a real course attended in Introduction to Programming would be beneficial because questions that youtube cant answer a teacher/instructor generally can.

If you are the type of person who can use a book and follow it precisely there are all sorts of programming books out there with labs in them to follow like a cook book to making a program that works and if you get an older edition of a book you can get them very cheap. Back when i was in college I saved myself about $75 by buying the 2nd edition of a book used when the 3rd edition was suggested. The only differences was a few more examples added to make a section more descriptive.

From my own mistakes with learning programming since the mid-1980s and not being a master of any language but familiar with a bunch of different languages, its best to figure out what you want to program. Do you want to program for android devices, do you want to program for a websites web server, do you want to program games, do you want to program complex calculations that perform encryption and decryption or scientific research, or something else. Each language has its pros ( strengths ) and cons ( weaknesses ) for implementation towards specific programming goals.

Given that you mention Linux and Windows... My language suggestion is to learn Python and go from there. C and C++ I wouldn't suggest for anyone that never programmed before. Python is very platform flexible and used a lot. Once you master structure and internal functionality of object oriented programming with reuse vs putting in redundant instructions you will then have a good foundation to build from to explore other languages and when learning another language it will be far easier because you know how a FOR loop works for example vs a WHILE loop and then you can just learn the syntax of it all but the structure is all very similar, then dive into C or C++ with dependency needs etc if you want something more complex or any other language of choice because you know the internal workings of a program structure and just need to conform to the specific syntax of that language.