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Author Topic: Dual Monitor Problem TV+Monitor (Clone mode) Monitor (OK) TV (No Color)  (Read 3000 times)

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oberon

    Topic Starter


    Greenhorn

    Hi I wanted to use my CRT TV as a second monitor and connected it to my Computer using an 'S' connector.

    I have an NVIDIA 5500 Card with TV Out. so I ran the Cable from this to my TV.

    I then Selected Clone mode to get the same picture on my Monitor and my TV the problem is while my Monitor works fine and displays in color my TV only displays in Black and White.

    So how do I get my TV to display in Color when connected to my Computer.

    Note: The TV works fine for normal TV reception its just that it won't display in Color when using it as an additional Monitor.

    Mulreay

    • Guest
    You will alway struggle with a cathode screen. You need to really have a T.V that has a VGA port. Which generally means spending money. My tv is a Sony Bravia with a VGA port and it works perfect but I had to spend the money to get it. 

    oberon

      Topic Starter


      Greenhorn

      Hi Mulreay

      Now that is a very interesting answer, no one has picked up on that not even on 'You Tube' where I got the idea from.

      Coincidently my Monitor an 8 year old CRT gave up the ghost to-day, the colors were running all over the place and I had to keep bashing it with my hand in order to get it to work as I think the colors guns were shot away.

      Got one from a Charity shop just to tide me over but I really want a bigger and better one this time as the price of monitors has gone down so much.

      Even so this brings me to an interesting dilemma.

      I was planning to spend 200 on a new 21 inc monitor but would the money be better spent on a 42inch HD Plasma or LCD at 450.

      Would the HD Plasma have either enough or more than enough resolution to compare with a Standard Monitor?

      I would love to work on a 42inch Screen and also use it as my TV as well.

      If practical then the extra 250 would be well worth it to me, as I really could do with a new TV as well.

      Should I go for Plasma or LCD? and what are the chances of messing it up by holding a still image on it for Photo manipulation etc?

      In any event Thank you for a brilliant answer to my question.


      Mulreay

      • Guest
      LCD always. Plasma has screen burn problems. Plasma is ok to watch a film but if you use it for a computer you wil get screen burn. You can't get that with LCD. If you can afford it you want a 1080p LCD. NOT 1080i. Make sure it has HD connectors for things like PS3 and VGI port for PC.

      oberon

        Topic Starter


        Greenhorn

        Hi Mulreay

        LCD it is then but what does the 1080i and 1080p mean? don't as yet understand what that is about.

        Mulreay

        • Guest
        1080p is the shorthand name for a category of HDTV video modes. The number "1080" represents 1,080 lines of vertical resolution (1080 horizontal scan lines),[1] while the letter p stands for progressive scan (meaning the image is not interlaced). 1080p can be referred to as full HD or full high definition to differentiate it from other HDTV video modes.[2] The term usually assumes a widescreen aspect ratio of 16:9, implying a horizontal resolution of 1920 pixels. This creates a frame resolution of 19201080, or 2,073,600 pixels in total. The frame rate in hertz can be either implied by the context or specified after the letter p (or i), such as 1080p30, meaning 30 Hz.[3]

        1080p is sometimes referred to in marketing materials as "Complete High-Definition". However, 2K/4K digital cinema technology is commercially available, and ultra-high definition video is in the research phase.

        In addition to the meaning of 1080p as a display resolution, 1080p is also used to describe video equipment capabilities. Use of 1080p and the closely related 1080i labels in consumer products may refer to a range of capabilities. For example, video equipment that upscales to 1080p takes lower resolution material and reformats it for a higher resolution display. The image that results is different from the display of original 1080p source material on a native 1080p capable-display. Similarly, equipment capable of displaying both 720p and 1080i may in fact not have the capability to display 1080p or 1080i material at full resolution. It is common for this material to be downscaled to the native capability of the equipment. The term "native 1080p-capable" is sometimes used to refer to equipment capable of rendering 1080p fully.


        Geek-9pm


          Mastermind
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        As for a standard TV set, in the USA the lines per frame is set at 526 horizontal lines in a complete frame. Each frame has two fields. The frame was 30 frames per second until Color TV dropped it down just a bit.

        So then that would mean 526 vertical elements, and that would imply aout 700 horizontal elements. But that is not really the case.

        The point here is that the standard TV resolutions is not so good!


        oberon

          Topic Starter


          Greenhorn

          Hi Mulreay

          Thanks a million you saved me from making a very expensive mistake, as I went to a well known 'Superstore' with not so 'Super Assistants' who were basically trying to 'Blag it' with their not so 'Super Knowledge'

          But as I was armed with the info thanks to your mega response, for once in my life I felt like I knew what I was talking about and think I've found what I am looking for.

          The Samsung Chrystal that I saw had the most amazing picture that I have ever seen in all my life and so I am going to buy one this weekend.

          Thanks for your help

          Which I very much appreciated.


          Mulreay

          • Guest
          No problem at all mate glad to help  ;D