Welcome guest. Before posting on our computer help forum, you must register. Click here it's easy and free.

Author Topic: linking routers  (Read 2552 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

aaskl

    Topic Starter


    Rookie

    linking routers
    « on: March 02, 2010, 10:28:59 PM »
    Hi,

    Can we link 2 routers together? Reason is I live in a new apartment and there is only 1 telephone/cable socket in the bedroom. My bedroom is quite small so it'd be quite difficult to put the printer in my room. The only place I can put my printer is out in the lounge where there is no telephone/cable socket.

    But since I have 2 routers, is it possible to connect my room router to the phone/cable socket then connect via wireless to my lounge router which is connected via USB to my printer? Would I be able to set up wireless printer that way? If so, how? Any references I can follow?

    Thank you guys very much

    Geek-9pm


      Mastermind
    • Geek After Dark
    • Thanked: 1003
      • Gekk9pm bnlog
    • Certifications: List
    • Computer: Specs
    • Experience: Expert
    • OS: Windows XP
    Re: linking routers
    « Reply #1 on: March 03, 2010, 12:04:23 AM »
    We understand what you want to do, but are not sure about what equipment you have.
    Getting two router to join together on wireless is not as easy as it sounds.
    Which routers do you have? Some can not run Ad-Hoc.
    Is the printer wireless?Is it network compatible?

    Is this a laptop computer with a built-in wireless?

    hodges91



      Rookie

      Re: linking routers
      « Reply #2 on: March 03, 2010, 10:00:50 AM »
      A lot of times it does not depend on the hardware, but more the firmware. Check your WebGUI for your product. I know on many of the newer firmwares for most vendors (2+ years or newer) have RIP which allowed two routers to communicate.


      (This is an example using Linksys Firmware)

      You will have to manually setup the route, if you do not know how to do this properly (IP addressing / subnetting schemes,) I suggest you get / look up a subnetting calculator.

      1 ) Log into your WebGUI
      2 ) In the 'Setup' tab: Click the 'Advanced Routing' subcategory
      3 ) Disable NAT (You can't use NAT in conjunction with RIP)
      4 ) Enable RIP
      5 ) Enter the Destination Address (IP Address of the router it's connecting to)
      6 ) Enter the Subnet Mask for the network
      7 ) Enter the IP address of the Gateway (Either the router you're connecting to, or the router you're setting up itself.)
      8 ) Select the interface for the Destination Address

      Then click save settings. If you still need help, there is a little 'Help' link towards the top right for Linksys firmware, the that basically lists the steps I said above. I use DD-WRT and it just displays the help file on the right side. I'm assuming if that was the case you wouldn't need much help.

      aaskl

        Topic Starter


        Rookie

        Re: linking routers
        « Reply #3 on: March 11, 2010, 12:17:31 AM »
        I have a inbuilt wireless laptop.

        2 wireless routers (1 with usb port, 1 without usb port) - model -

        1. NETGEAR DB834G v2 (without usb)
        2. NETGEAR DB834Gu v5 (with usb)

        That's basically all I have.

        Please advise

        Thanks

        Geek-9pm


          Mastermind
        • Geek After Dark
        • Thanked: 1003
          • Gekk9pm bnlog
        • Certifications: List
        • Computer: Specs
        • Experience: Expert
        • OS: Windows XP
        Re: linking routers
        « Reply #4 on: March 11, 2010, 07:53:29 AM »
        Those routers are easy touse.
        Both are found here:
        http://kb.netgear.com/app/products/family/a_id/1288
        The documentation tells how to get into the setup for each router.
        Follow the directions give by hodges91

        aaskl

          Topic Starter


          Rookie

          Re: linking routers
          « Reply #5 on: March 11, 2010, 10:41:24 PM »
          Thanks I'll give it a try.

          The NAT is what translates the ISP's IP into the local network IP right? If I disable that will my router still feed me my local IPs?

          And what is RIP?

          Thanks


          Geek-9pm


            Mastermind
          • Geek After Dark
          • Thanked: 1003
            • Gekk9pm bnlog
          • Certifications: List
          • Computer: Specs
          • Experience: Expert
          • OS: Windows XP
          Re: linking routers
          « Reply #6 on: March 12, 2010, 12:50:31 AM »
          For the Net gear DG834G routers:

          Quote
          Static and Dynamic Routing with TCP/IP, VPN pass-through (IPSec, L2TP, PPTP), NAT, UDP, RIP, PPPoE, PPPoA, Classical IP, DNS, DHCP (client & server)

          These are protocols the router can handle.
           TCP/IP is the common protocol.
          The DSL modem will use  PPTP or something like that.
          NAT is not always needed for some network tasks. S see this:
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_address_translation

          But you need to read over the documentation and the setup guides provided by Net gear. You need to understand what it means to 'reset' the router/modem. And you have to understand what it means to change the base IP address of either outer itself. At least one of them has to have a different IP for the local network.
          ftp://downloads.netgear.com/files/DG834Gv5_SM_31Mar08.pdf

          It should not be necessary to use static address on you PCs.
          I am willing to help you, but I have limited ability to study long documentation. As for me, just change a few things until I get it to work. When I tie two routers together I cripple  the closer one by turning of  its DCHP and giving it an IP inside the range the front router or gateway wants for DCHP Doing that I can not use the WAN port. But it works. In effect, the router is like a hub.

          To tie two routers using the WAN port you must study the documentation for advanced users. Or just go to the NETGEAR forum and look around.
          http://forum1.netgear.com/

          EDIT: Simple answer. One router will have all its features set in the normal way It is the one that hooks to the internet. Then second will provide connection for additional PCs and will have some things disabled.
          « Last Edit: March 12, 2010, 01:01:12 AM by Geek-9pm »