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Author Topic: CPU temperature overload  (Read 4042 times)

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jessp2010

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    Greenhorn

    CPU temperature overload
    « on: April 17, 2010, 06:52:09 AM »
    Hi,
    When trying to turn my computer on this morning, it started to load up but then gave me an error message during that start-up saying CPU Temperate Overload. Press F1 to continue. I pressed F1 and it proceeded to a blank black screen and would go no further.

    I've turned the power off and re-started the computer, but continue to either get the same message, or just a black screen and no start-up. When it only gives the black screen a monitor message occasionally flashes on saying 'No Signal Detected'.

    I am using Windows XP SP3.

    Any help with this would be appreciated, thanks.

    Calum

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    Re: CPU temperature overload
    « Reply #1 on: April 17, 2010, 07:40:41 AM »
    Firstly, welcome to the forums :)

    We're going to need a little more information in order to help you troubleshoot.
    Most importantly, did anything happen or did anything change before this issue started?
    How old is the PC, and what are its main specifications?  Make/model would also be fine.

    jessp2010

      Topic Starter


      Greenhorn

      Re: CPU temperature overload
      « Reply #2 on: April 17, 2010, 09:48:39 AM »
      Thanks for your reply and welcome.

      The computer is about 5 years old, but had a new harddrive put in around 6 months ago. As for computer specifications, it says it is an AMD 64 Athlon on the front, but I can't tell you anymore than that unfortunately.

      I tried to start it again, and it will start up and I was able to login to my user account. However, as that was loading up the computer froze, and an alarm noise started.

      patio

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      Re: CPU temperature overload
      « Reply #3 on: April 17, 2010, 09:55:57 AM »
      Have you opened the case and done any housekeeping ? ?
      NOTE: A small soft paintbrush anad a can of compressed air are best for this...
      Do NOT use a vacuum.

      Pay special attention to all heatsinks; fans and vent holes
         
       
      " Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined. "

      jessp2010

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        Greenhorn

        Re: CPU temperature overload
        « Reply #4 on: April 17, 2010, 10:04:20 AM »
        Which case? And where can I get to the heatsinks, fans and vent holes? I see where the fan is and I have tried cleaning dust off there (without opening the mesh in front of it) and will look closer and try to clean it better. But at which other points can I get to something to clean? I'm guessing this is an overheating problem.

        Thanks patio.

        Salmon Trout



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        Re: CPU temperature overload
        « Reply #5 on: April 17, 2010, 10:05:20 AM »
        Maybe the CPU fan is not working? My Pentium 4 Prescott, which is from the same era, would run for about 2 minutes before thermal shutdown.

        Salmon Trout



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        Re: CPU temperature overload
        « Reply #6 on: April 17, 2010, 10:06:58 AM »
        Which case?

        The computer case. Unless this is a laptop? So far we don't know anything about this machine.

        Calum

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        Re: CPU temperature overload
        « Reply #7 on: April 17, 2010, 10:08:50 AM »
        As has been mentioned above, it definitely sounds like an overheating issue.
        Check out this page for some information on cleaning dust and general dirt from your PC.
        You say it's around 5 years old which is more than enough time for dust to clog up fans and heatsinks, leading to overheating.
        Further to Salmon Trout's point, power up the machine with the side off and make sure the CPU fan (it most likely says AMD on it, if you're not sure which one it is...it should be nearer the top left of the motherboard) is spinning.

        jessp2010

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          Greenhorn

          Re: CPU temperature overload
          « Reply #8 on: April 17, 2010, 10:12:05 AM »
          The computer case. Unless this is a laptop? So far we don't know anything about this machine.


          It is a desktop computer, not a laptop. Sorry for any confusion.

          Thanks for the extra advice Calum, I'll have a look at the link and try to clean the fan etc again.

          Calum

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          Re: CPU temperature overload
          « Reply #9 on: April 17, 2010, 10:14:43 AM »
          No problem.  Good luck with the cleaning, and let us know what's happening after you've done that.
          If you have any questions in the meantime feel free to post back and ask them.

          jessp2010

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            Greenhorn

            Re: CPU temperature overload
            « Reply #10 on: April 17, 2010, 12:03:16 PM »
            I've had a look at that link and decided that I'm not comfortable with opening the case up to clean inside, I'm not familiar enough with it!

            When you say power up the machine with the side off, I'm guessing this involves taking something apart/off? Again, if it does involve doing that I'm not sure it's a good idea for me to try it! Could you explain more about what you mean there please? Thanks

            Salmon Trout



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            Re: CPU temperature overload
            « Reply #11 on: April 17, 2010, 12:21:45 PM »
            I've had a look at that link and decided that I'm not comfortable with opening the case up to clean inside, I'm not familiar enough with it!

            When you say power up the machine with the side off, I'm guessing this involves taking something apart/off? Again, if it does involve doing that I'm not sure it's a good idea for me to try it! Could you explain more about what you mean there please? Thanks

            Desktop computer cases have a removeable side panel or a cover which you can remove by undoing some screws. If you are not happy doing this sort of thing with your computer, you will definitely have to either find a person who is, or take the computer to a repair company.

            nyernga



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              Re: CPU temperature overload
              « Reply #12 on: April 18, 2010, 08:45:41 PM »
              I've had a look at that link and decided that I'm not comfortable with opening the case up to clean inside, I'm not familiar enough with it!

              When you say power up the machine with the side off, I'm guessing this involves taking something apart/off? Again, if it does involve doing that I'm not sure it's a good idea for me to try it! Could you explain more about what you mean there please? Thanks

              I just did this with my Dell. As long as the power is disconnected and you don't clean it like you would a garage, it's fairly safe and easy. Mine opens like a briefcase that's on it's side. Just remember to remove the power and you'll be surprised how easy it is.  As mentioned, save the vacuum for all the dustballs you'll blow out using a can of air.