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Author Topic: Pinging broadcast address  (Read 773 times)

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High1

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    Pinging broadcast address
    « on: January 31, 2019, 11:58:57 AM »
    Hello

    I am hoping to find out how many people may be accessing my wi fi. I pay for my ISP in a flat that neighbours five other flats. I am using Win 10.

    I read somewhere online that I need to do the following: ping my broadcast address (192.168.1.255). Then perform "arp -a" to determine all the computing devices. However, I get 
    Code: [Select]
    C:\>ping 192.168.1.255

    Pinging 192.168.1.255 with 32 bytes of data:
    Request timed out.
    Request timed out.
    Request timed out.
    Request timed out.

    Ping statistics for 192.168.1.255:
        Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),

    C:\>

    What am I doing wrong, please?

    Geek-9pm


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    Re: Pinging broadcast address
    « Reply #1 on: January 31, 2019, 01:18:10 PM »
    What you want should be done by program for that purpose.
    And your ability to do what you want may depend on your service provider.
    Change your password
    Talk to your service provider.

    Look in the app store for something.
    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/who-is-on-my-wifi/id770969761?mt=8
    Quote
    Works fantastic!
    No problems using it for me! I am not super tech savvy, but I figured out an easy way to verify the connections detected are yours by powering down your devices using wifi--computer, iPad, tv, roku, iPod, etc. then run the app again to see what is left still showing as connected.
    Have you tried?

    High1

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      Re: Pinging broadcast address
      « Reply #2 on: January 31, 2019, 01:23:57 PM »
      Thanks, Geek

      I think that's not compatible with Windows but I can look around.

      I thought it would be possible using Command Prompt

      DaveLembke



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      Re: Pinging broadcast address
      « Reply #3 on: January 31, 2019, 03:34:53 PM »
      Just a heads up that it might be as easy as looking in your router to see what leases were given out. There is also logging available in most routers. Looking at connected devices in the router you will see MAC Addresses and the IP Address that was issued to each device. All the devices you have access to you can confirm those MAC addresses against this list. When you see a MAC Address that is unknown you can enter its first 6 hex characters in a google search and get a pretty good idea on the device manufacturer - or - at least the network adapter manufacturer to see what that NIC chip is used in for devices.

      The biggest thing is that if you have control over your router with a strong password then no strangers should be easily connecting to it. They should be locked out so this seems kind of fishy that someone unwanted would be riding in on your wireless connection.

      Looking for other devices ( nodes ) unknown when connected to a wireless connection is more like something a hacker would do to detect other devices on the network that isn't their own; as for with direct access to router it would all be in plain view as well as password change for wireless to something that isnt in a dictionary should kick out anyone that is unwanted!

      High1

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        Re: Pinging broadcast address
        « Reply #4 on: January 31, 2019, 03:58:44 PM »
        Many thanks, Dave.
        I am in my router's software now and will take a look around!