Welcome guest. Before posting on our computer help forum, you must register. Click here it's easy and free.

Author Topic: need help setting up my computer for 1080p video, audio recording, animation  (Read 1549 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

TEC2LRN

    Topic Starter


    Rookie
    • Yes
  • Experience: Beginner
  • OS: Windows 7
I have put a system together already!
Here is what the case has in it!

MOBO= MSI x99A SLI (not a Plus model)
Drives = 1-250GB Samsung 850evo, 1-1TB Samsung 860evo, 4-Samsung 500GB 850evo, 2-WD 4TB Black
GPU= 1 MSI GeForce GTX 1070 Gaming X 8GB
RAM= 32GB Corsair memory
BDR = 1
DVD = 1
PSU = Sea Sonic 1350w Plat. Prime
Air Cooled

As I said as my subject "need help setting up my computer for 1080p video, audio recording, animation"

Software = Audio, Studio One Pro 3/ Video, Cyber Director 16/ Animation, MOHO Pro 12

I just don't know what to do?

Any help and answers would be most welcome!!!

Thanks in advance

DaveLembke



    Sage
  • Inventor of the Magna-Broom 3000 =)
  • Thanked: 635
  • Certifications: List
  • Computer: Specs
  • Experience: Expert
  • OS: Windows 10
What CPU are you running in it?

Also with software learning on how to do animations and all that stuff Youtube was a big help for me when I was learning Animation in college for Adobe's software suite which is now on a monthly subscription plan, which reduced cost to college students who show College ID or other proof that your an active college student.

I unfortunately dont have experience making high end 1080p video, but from the looks of it you might want to get a video recording device that can record in 1080p or a cature card that is able of that if wanting to record your desktop environment. I use to use a software called Fraps to record game content, but that wasn't 1080p and it was a raw dump of video pixel data to hard drive which made huge video files that had to be encoded to smaller format after recording done.


TEC2LRN

    Topic Starter


    Rookie
    • Yes
  • Experience: Beginner
  • OS: Windows 7
What CPU are you running in it?

Also with software learning on how to do animations and all that stuff Youtube was a big help for me when I was learning Animation in college for Adobe's software suite which is now on a monthly subscription plan, which reduced cost to college students who show College ID or other proof that your an active college student.

I unfortunately dont have experience making high end 1080p video, but from the looks of it you might want to get a video recording device that can record in 1080p or a cature card that is able of that if wanting to record your desktop environment. I use to use a software called Fraps to record game content, but that wasn't 1080p and it was a raw dump of video pixel data to hard drive which made huge video files that had to be encoded to smaller format after recording done.

Sorry for the delay  :-[

CPU = Intel 6850k
Yes I have watched and read a considerable amount of Youtube/other info. on the subject of Animation.

(Not to toot my own horn but I do have a somewhat creative gene within me, basically in all facets of Art...)

I've never been to college though in many cases I wish I could have gone! I'm to old now to go to college to learn what I have already taught myself even though I'm sure I would learn something (we are always learning at least I am) and a Degree or two wouldn't be bad. ;) ;) Que Sera, Sera
I've seen those mark downs for colleges and college certified, that's good since it cost a great deal of money to go to a good college for Art, I guess. :-\

Yes I do have some 1080p recording devices and the Software (CyberLink 16) has built-in Software for Screen Capture and it Automatically reduces Video File Size if one would like.

Trying to figure out where to put the files and bi-products? :-\ ???

Thank You for your response DaveLembke :)



camerongray



    Expert
  • Thanked: 305
    • Yes
    • Cameron Gray - The Random Rambings of a Computer Geek
  • Certifications: List
  • Computer: Specs
  • Experience: Expert
  • OS: Mac OS
You don't need to do anything special, just install the software you need then store files either in your documents/pictures/movies folders or put them on the separate drives if you need more space.

Personally I'd install the OS and software on the 1tb SSD. Use that SSD (or the other SSDs) for video files that you're currently working on so that you get good performance then use the 4tb hard drive for long term storage of files that you don't need to access as often.

TEC2LRN

    Topic Starter


    Rookie
    • Yes
  • Experience: Beginner
  • OS: Windows 7
You don't need to do anything special, just install the software you need then store files either in your documents/pictures/movies folders or put them on the separate drives if you need more space.

Personally I'd install the OS and software on the 1tb SSD. Use that SSD (or the other SSDs) for video files that you're currently working on so that you get good performance then use the 4tb hard drive for long term storage of files that you don't need to access as often.

Thanks camerongray 8)

Ok I think I'm beginning to catch on but I  :-\  ???
1. When you say "store files either in your documents/pictures/movies folders or put them on the separate drive if you need more space" are you referring to putting the documents/pictures/movies folders on another/or drive(s)?
2. Do I move the documents/pictures/movies folders to another drive and/or other drives prior to install of software? (not speaking of the OS)
3. Which documents/pictures/movies folders do I move such as... This PC: documents/pictures/movies folders or USER: documents/pictures/movies folders? Or both?
4. ?

"Personally I'd install the OS and software on the 1tb SSD. Use that SSD (or the other SSDs) for video files that you're currently working on so that you get good performance then use the 4tb hard drive for long term storage of files that you don't need to access as often."

Yes exactly  8) :) Lead me to the land of milk and honey! 8) but ::)

1. So I can use a SSD for each job such as... Drive D: 500gig video editing working drive, Drive E: 500gig audio working drive, Drive F: 500gig animation working drive?
2. Have any idea if video files create their own temp files and same for animation?

At the present I am installing the whole software(s) onto its each own drive. ::) :-\ ??? ;D :D ???

Thanks for your response, camerongray :)

« Last Edit: May 22, 2019, 02:17:50 PM by TEC2LRN »

TEC2LRN

    Topic Starter


    Rookie
    • Yes
  • Experience: Beginner
  • OS: Windows 7
Thanks camerongray 8)

Ok I think I'm beginning to catch on but I  :-\  ???
1. When you say "store files either in your documents/pictures/movies folders or put them on the separate drive if you need more space" are you referring to putting the documents/pictures/movies folders on another/or drive(s)?
2. Do I move the documents/pictures/movies folders to another drive and/or other drives prior to install of software? (not speaking of the OS)
3. Which documents/pictures/movies folders do I move such as... This PC: documents/pictures/movies folders or USER: documents/pictures/movies folders? Or both?
4. ?

"Personally I'd install the OS and software on the 1tb SSD. Use that SSD (or the other SSDs) for video files that you're currently working on so that you get good performance then use the 4tb hard drive for long term storage of files that you don't need to access as often."

Yes exactly  8) :) Lead me to the land of milk and honey! 8) but ::)

1. So I can use a SSD for each job such as... Drive D: 500gig video editing working drive, Drive E: 500gig audio working drive, Drive F: 500gig animation working drive?
2. Have any idea if video files create their own temp files and same for animation?

At the present I am installing the whole software(s) onto its each own drive. ::) :-\ ??? ;D :D ???

Thanks for your response, camerongray :)

patio

  • Moderator


  • Genius
  • Maud' Dib
  • Thanked: 1723
    • Yes
  • Experience: Beginner
  • OS: Windows 7
Why did you feel the need to Quote yer last Post ? ?
Just curious...
" Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined. "

TEC2LRN

    Topic Starter


    Rookie
    • Yes
  • Experience: Beginner
  • OS: Windows 7

TEC2LRN

    Topic Starter


    Rookie
    • Yes
  • Experience: Beginner
  • OS: Windows 7
Why did you feel the need to Quote yer last Post ? ?
Just curious...

Didn't mean to??? :o ???

camerongray



    Expert
  • Thanked: 305
    • Yes
    • Cameron Gray - The Random Rambings of a Computer Geek
  • Certifications: List
  • Computer: Specs
  • Experience: Expert
  • OS: Mac OS
It's really not an exact science, I'd install all software to the C: drive (installing software across drives will do nothing other than cause confusion in the future) then store files across other drives in whatever way makes sense to you, there's no "best" way to do it.

TEC2LRN

    Topic Starter


    Rookie
    • Yes
  • Experience: Beginner
  • OS: Windows 7
It's really not an exact science, I'd install all software to the C: drive (installing software across drives will do nothing other than cause confusion in the future) then store files across other drives in whatever way makes sense to you, there's no "best" way to do it.

Thanks camerongray 8)

Yes, don't get me wrong that is exactly what I wish to do, as you said above.
1. I install all software to the C: drive.
 
Quote
then store files across other drives in whatever way makes sense to you

2. I guess that's where I lose it :-\ How do I get the files that I want to work on, onto a different drive to work on?

Again Thank You camerongray :)

camerongray



    Expert
  • Thanked: 305
    • Yes
    • Cameron Gray - The Random Rambings of a Computer Geek
  • Certifications: List
  • Computer: Specs
  • Experience: Expert
  • OS: Mac OS
It's just like using an external hard drive or USB stick, each drive will show up with its own drive letter in the file explorer, create whatever folders you want on each drive and stick your files in them. Also bear in mind that just because you have all those drives doesn't mean you need to use them all, may as well keep things simple rather than storing files all over the place just because you have the drives.

BC_Programmer


    Mastermind
  • Typing is no substitute for thinking.
  • Thanked: 1105
    • Yes
    • Yes
    • BC-Programming.com
  • Certifications: List
  • Computer: Specs
  • Experience: Beginner
  • OS: Windows 8
Perhaps an example based on how I use my own drives? I haven't created video content in years but it may still apply.

I have three drives. a 1TB SSD, 4TB WD Blue, and a 4TB WD Red. Simplified, the arrangement is pretty straightforward- the SSD gets things that need to be very fast. the Hard Disks get things that are very big. For example the HDD(s) is where I have my file hoard- installers, downloaded ISO files, Video files, movie files, music, generic unsorted downloads, etc. Stuff that I don't use constantly and which will not be affected by the lower speed of the HDD. They got onto those drives because I put them there or copied them there. (coincidentally, this is where I have some recordings that I intended to turn into videos but haven't bothered but also cannot bring myself to delete...)

Most software I have installed is installed onto my C: drive, the SSD. This way it can access it's software files quickly. My OS paging file is on my SSD, and while the only software I think I have with the settings you mention (eg. Scratch Disk) is Photoshop, I have that set up to only use C: as a scratch disk- again, for performance since the two Spinning disk drives are much slower in comparison.

There are two things to consider here:

This is not all my drives though. Even discounting drives I have "in active service" in other computers, I have two Hard Drives, new in box, completely unused except to verify they aren't Dead-on-arrival- a 4TB WD Red and a 4TB WD Blue. They are specifically replacements for when mine die, since mine are starting to get on in years and it's always a matter of time before they fail. First sign of trouble, I clone the problem drive to the new one, replace it in my PC, and I have everything as it was with minimal downtime and (ideally) less risk of data loss. You don't need to install every drive you have in a PC.
I was trying to dereference Null Pointers before it was cool.