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Author Topic: Dual and Triple boot with Ubuntu and Windows.  (Read 996 times)

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Geek-9pm

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Dual and Triple boot with Ubuntu and Windows.
« on: December 21, 2017, 09:11:52 PM »
Yesterday I installed Ubuntu 16.04.3 on my hard drive, which already had Windos XP and Windows 10. (I made a backup before I stated.)

Ubuntu did install grub, the linux boot manager wiht no problems, But I wanted the default to be Windows, not Ubuntu. This was a custom install.

So I  also found a neat little thing for grub to be a visual thing.

The nmount points in Linux confuse me, so I kput the script I found on a USB stick. Here is the script I sed to make the boot manager eay to modify.
Quote
$ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer
$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install grub-customizer
The $ represents the prompt you get from the shell in a terminal mode thing. You type in the stuff after the $. Tokk me a bit to remember that. I am getting older.

After doing that, there is a new thing for grub that lets you see what the boot list is. Yu can move an entry up or down. The top item is the default.

So I put Windows 10 on the top. It works, nd up comes the windows 10 boot manager that lets me pick either Windows 10 or the eralier verson of Windows. Which happens to be Windows XP.

So now I can have Ubuntu anytime I want without waiting for the live demo DVD to load.

Ubuntu takes very little disk space. It takes only about 5 GB for Ubuntu 16.04 and a little pbit of swap space. But I put it on a much larger partition so it has room to grow. Even so, I still have spare room on my 250 Gb hard drive on this old Dell 755 ATX size desktop. BTW, I have my HDD in the old MBR style, not the new thing.  The new thing for HDD is not needed if yu do not have a monster drive. So I made no effort to go with the new standard for HDD. Cn't even remember what it is called.

I recomend yu try Ununtu 16.04.3 Lts for yhourself. It is very nice and ease to use. On the internet, it performs as well or even better taht a Windows based system. You have a choice of Firefox and other popular web browsers.It has not problem reading test and image files creadted by Windows. Libre Office is included, as well as the usual Linux things.

Hope you enjoy Linux. If something bad happens to your Windows install, you can boot up Umbutu and get on the Internet. Nice to have it ahndy.  ;D

Quantos



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Re: Dual and Triple boot with Ubuntu and Windows.
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2017, 09:38:19 PM »
I think you messed something up with your installation, that's far too small an installation of Ubuntu

https://askubuntu.com/questions/760408/can-i-install-ubuntu-16-04-lts-with-less-than-25gb-hard-disk-space

<edit>  Is that the partition size or data size?  </edit>
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Geek-9pm

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Re: Dual and Triple boot with Ubuntu and Windows.
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2017, 10:49:26 PM »
The drive is a 250 GB standard desktop drive. it is divided into a number or partitions. Below is a screenshot of my drive in Windows  drive manager. HYou will notice the Linux, Ubuntu, partiton is 'unknown' becuase wineos does not read taht format.
The partition is about 37 GB with only some 5 GB used by Ubunty.
Sorry if I caused confusion. I would not recomend using less taht 20 GB for any modern operationg system


The attachment is in PNG 8 color to conserve CH bandwidth.
EDIT: Anybody with low disk space ought to first clean things up by removing stuff taht is not really needed. Like old downloads, you tube video and other thins yoou cou easily get again later. Then use a good partition maneger to open up some space. I like the mini-tool, free edition.
https://www.minitool.com/partition-manager/partition-wizard-home.html
It can also verify a partition and check for erros. I did that before installing Ubuntu. I did a custom install and let Umbuntu used the unused space I created between two partitions.

[attachment deleted by admin to conserve space]
« Last Edit: December 21, 2017, 11:02:19 PM by Geek-9pm »

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Re: Dual and Triple boot with Ubuntu and Windows.
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2017, 02:56:55 AM »
Yeah, I just misunderstood, I thought you were trying to use a 5GB partition, more than enough for Puppy but pretty shy for anything else.

Take a look at GParted as a partition manager, reads Linux partition tables just fine.  Oh, and for a graphical GRUB try GRUB 2.0 - I think you just might like it a bit more

<edit>  You actually could use a 5GB partition, but you would spend a great deal of time running maintenance and deleting things (like old kernels)  </edit>
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Geek-9pm

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Re: Dual and Triple boot with Ubuntu and Windows.
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2017, 11:30:04 AM »
Ues, I have used Puppy and Gpartd sometime ago. But now way would I ever have time to try all of the most popular distros of Linux.
Here is a list from Google:


most popular linux distros

Ubuntu and Fedora at on top. I chose the Ubuntu 16.04.3 version becuase it offers long term support. Maybe I will not need the support, but nice to know it is there.
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LTS
Quote
LTS is an abbreviation for “Long Term Support”.

We produce a new Ubuntu Desktop and Ubuntu Server release every six months. That means you'll always have the latest and greatest applications that the open source world has to offer. Ubuntu is designed with security in mind. You get free security updates for at least 9 months on the desktop and server.

A new LTS version is released every two years. In previous releases, a Long Term Support (LTS) version had three years support on Ubuntu (Desktop) and five years on Ubuntu Server. Starting with Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, both versions received five years support. There is no extra fee for the LTS version; we make our very best work available to everyone on the same free terms. Upgrades to new versions of Ubuntu are and always will be free of charge.

The LTS designation applies only to specific subsets of the Ubuntu archive. The LTS may not apply to all flavours and remixes of Ubuntu. For example, for 8.04 LTS, Kubuntu chose to move to KDE 4.0 and didn't issue an LTS release. In 10.04, the Netbook Edition was not an LTS. The project will decide which flavours will be LTS and the support duration for each, early in the LTS development cycle.
Anybody whjo works in IT might already know that Umbuntu 15.04 can be used as a server.
https://poweruphosting.com/blog/initial-server-setup-ubuntu-16-04/
 ;D