Linux chdir function

Updated: 05/04/2019 by Computer Hope
chdir command

On Unix-like operating systems, chdir is the system call for changing the current working directory.

This document covers the GNU/Linux version of chdir.

Description

chdir changes the current working directory of the calling process to the directory specified in path.

Syntax

#include <unistd.h>
int chdir(const char *path);

Return Value

On success, zero (0) is returned. On an error, -1 is returned, and errno is set appropriately.

Errors

Depending on the filesystem, other errors can be returned. The more general errors for chdir are listed below:

EACCES

Search permission is denied for one of the components of path.

EFAULT

path points outside the accessible address space.

EIO

An I/O error occurred.

ELOOP

Too many symbolic links were encountered in resolving path.

ENAMETOOLONG

path is too long.

ENOENT

The file does not exist.

ENOMEM

Insufficient kernel memory was available.

ENOTDIR

A component of path is not a directory.

Notes

The current working directory is the starting point for interpreting relative pathnames (those not starting with '/').

A child process created via fork inherits its parent's current working directory. The current working directory is left unchanged by execve.

cd — Change the working directory.
chroot — Run a command or shell from another directory, and treat that directory as root.
ls — List the contents of a directory or directories.